Author Interviews!

September is Meet The Authors month here on the Perfect Coven Blog! We’re featuring short-&-sweet interviews with the writing team of the Perfect Coven series. I’ve chosen five of the silliest, most common, or odd interview questions that I could find and sent them to the writers. Their responses will give you an insight into their respective personalities. It’s up to you to decide how serious or how tongue-in-cheek these answers are (and you may well be surprised at which are which, if I ever divulge that information!*).

M.L. James – author of Perfect Coven 3: Jasper’s Song

  1. The one all writers dread: where do you get your ideas?
  • The classic answer to this question is “There’s a lady who runs an idea store in Schenectady.” And that used to be true. But things have changed with the rising of the internet. Now, all writers go to http://www.thisiswheretogetideas.com for all their story ideas. You have to register with a credit card, but you get a collection of ideas each year and can use as many of them as you want.
  1. What is your weird writing ritual (because we know all authors have one)?
  • I don’t have one. Of course, that could depend a lot on your definition of “weird ritual”. Dressing the cat in a mu-mu and dancing the Charleston with him doesn’t count as weird, does it?
  1. How did you prepare for this interview?
  • I didn’t. I was caught completely unprepared and by surprise.
  1. What is the biggest lie you’ve ever told?
  • The answer to one of the previous three questions. You get to guess which one.
  1. Who is your favorite character to write that you did NOT create?
  • This is actually a really hard question. There are some very interesting characters in this series, and most of them were not created by me. I have a list of favorites. In no particular order: Charlie, Mars, Annaliese, and Shelley.

Bonus question (you don’t have to answer this one): what’s the most disturbing dream you’ve ever had? Is it a recurring dream?

  • In my family, there is a dream that many of us have. Some of the details vary from person to person, but the main thrust of the dream is the same. We dream that we are sharing a meal with someone. This will always be someone close to the dreamer. There will be no one else in the dream but the dreamer and the Other. For each dreamer, the place and the meal will always be the same, no matter who the Other is. For me, for example, it is always eating pizza at a concrete picnic table in a roadside park. For my mother, it has always been eating spaghetti in her high school cafeteria. My brother says his dreams involve him eating hot dogs while leaning up against a kitchen island. One thing remains consistent: no matter who the dreamer is, within a week of the dream, the Other will die. This has never failed to happen.

R.G. Michaels – author of Perfect Coven 1: Charlie’s Web

  1. The one all writers dread: where do you get your ideas?
  • I generally get my best ideas while sitting in traffic, day-dreaming. My next book will be a murder mystery.
  1. What is your weird writing ritual (because we know all authors have one)?
  • I can only write in my pajamas.
  1. How did you prepare for this interview?
  • I went to Dragon*Con, slept 15 hours, then drank 5 cups of coffee to be completely alert.
  1. What is the biggest lie you’ve ever told?
  • “I don’t know.”
  1. Who is your favorite character to write that you did NOT create?
  • I really enjoy writing Shelley. Since she invokes different gods depending on the situation, it’s fun trying to find the correct entity for the situation.

Bonus question (you don’t have to answer this one): what’s the most disturbing dream you’ve ever had? Is it a recurring dream?

  • I was running down Peachtree Street (downtown Atlanta), chased by eight foot tall T-Rexes. They were biting peoples’ heads off. This is not a recurring dream or else I’d never leave the house out of paranoia.

T.L. Sidney – author of Perfect Coven 2: Cursebreaker’s Dance

  1. The one all writers dread: where do you get your ideas?
  • I’ve actually tried M.L.’s website, but it didn’t work for me; I don’t know if the web was down, or if it was because I tried to use a credit card belonging to a character from one of my books. Anyway, now I invade other writer’s dreams and steal their ideas before they know they’ve had them.
  1. What is your weird writing ritual (because we know all authors have one)?
  • I don’t know about “weird”. I really don’t think I’m weird in acting out all love or fight scenes with Lego minifigures, do you?
  1. How did you prepare for this interview?
  1. What is the biggest lie you’ve ever told?
  • “No, of course I didn’t invade your dreams and steal the idea for a paranormal romance series featuring witches and snarky familiars from you.”
  1. Who is your favorite character to write that you did NOT create?
  • This is a hard question because we have so many wonderful, complicated characters, and at the same time an easy one: Ette! Always Ette! I love coming up with her commentary, because she always has the last word, even if it’s just a whistle, a chirp, or a flip of her tailfeathers!

Bonus question (you don’t have to answer this one): what’s the most disturbing dream you’ve ever had? Is it a recurring dream?

  • I think maybe I’m the disturbing dream other authors have….

Mickie says: September already?! I’m really looking forward to cooler weather. My story is heating up and my personal deadline is approaching. OMG the pressure!

James says: Some of what we have included in the biographies of our pseudonym authors is true of ourselves. Most of it isn’t. We’re hoping readers will enjoy trying to figure out which tidbits are true.

Working under a pseudonym is something new for me. I am usually just arrogant enough that when something I write sees print, I want everyone to know it’s me. But this project is different. This isn’t my work; this is the work of all three of us. We have each contributed so much to it, and brought so much growth and evolution to one another’s ideas, that it is no longer possible to say that anything in this world is purely the creation of just one of us. And that makes using the pseudonyms perfect for this. The “authors” are as much a group creation as the stories themselves, and we can all three share in what we make them out to be.

*P.M. me for Paypal information if you want to know!